Hack Week 21: Keeping the Battery Full

As described in some detail in my last post, we have a single 10kWh Redflow ZCell zinc bromine flow battery hooked up to our solar PV via Victron inverter/chargers. This gives us the ability to:

  • Store almost all the excess energy we generate locally for later use.
  • When the sun isn’t shining, grid charge the battery at off-peak times then draw it down at peak times to save on our electricity bill (peak grid power is slightly more than twice as expensive as off-peak grid power).
  • Opportunistically survive grid outages, provided they don’t happen at the wrong time (i.e. when the sun is down and the battery is at 0% state of charge).

By their nature, ZCell flow batteries needs to undergo a maintenance cycle at least every three days, where they are discharged completely for a few hours. That’s why the last point above reads “opportunistically survive grid outages”. With a single ZCell, we can’t use the “minimum state of charge” feature of the Victron kit to always keep some charge in the battery in case of outages, because doing so conflicts with the ZCell maintenance cycles. Once we eventually get a second battery, this problem will go away because the maintenance cycles automatically interleave. In the meantime though, as my project for Hack Week 21, I decided to see if I could somehow automate the Victron scheduled charge configuration based on the ZCell maintenance cycle timing, to always keep the battery as full as possible for as long as possible.

Continue reading

Go With The Flow

We installed 5.94kW of solar PV in late 2017, with an ABB PVI-6000TL-OUTD inverter, and also a nice energy efficient Sanden heat pump hot water service to replace our crusty old conventional electric hot water system. In the four years since then we’ve generated something like 24MWh of electricity, but were actually only able to directly use maybe 45% of that – the rest was exported to the grid.

The plan had always been to get batteries once we are able to afford to do so, and this actually happened in August 2021, when we finally got a single 10kWh Redflow ZCell zinc bromine flow battery installed. We went with Redflow for several reasons:

  • Unlike every other type of battery, they’re not a horrible fire hazard (in fact, the electrolyte, while corrosive, is actually fire retardant – a good thing when you live in a bushfire prone area).
  • They’re modular, so you can just keep adding more of them.
  • 100% depth of discharge (i.e. they’re happy to keep being cycled, and can also be left discharged/idle for extended periods).
  • All the battery components are able to be recycled at end of life.
  • They’re Australian designed and developed, with manufacturing in Thailand.

Our primary reasons for wanting battery storage were to ensure we’re using renewable energy rather than fossil fuels, to try to actually use all our local power generation locally, and to attain some degree of disaster resilience.

Continue reading

Scope Creep

On December 22, I decided to brew an oatmeal stout (5kg Gladfield ale malt, 250g dark chocolate malt, 250g light chocolate malt, 250g dark crystal malt, 500g rolled oats, 150g rice hulls to stop the mash sticking, 25g Pride of Ringwood hops, Safale US-05 yeast). This all takes a good few hours to do the mash and the boil and everything, so while that was underway I thought it’d be a good opportunity to remove a crappy old cupboard from the laundry, so I could put our nice Miele upright freezer in there, where it’d be closer to the kitchen (the freezer is presently in a room at the other end of the house).

Continue reading

I Have No Idea How To Debug This

On my desktop system, I’m running XFCE on openSUSE Tumbleweed. When I leave my desk, I hit the “lock screen” button, the screen goes black, and the monitors go into standby. So far so good. When I come back and mash the keyboard, everything lights up again, the screens go white, and it says:

blank: Shows nothing but a black screen
Name: tserong@HOSTNAME
Password:
Enter password to unlock; select icon to lock

So I type my password, hit ENTER, and I’m back in action. So far so good again. Except… Several times recently, when I’ve come back and mashed the keyboard, the white overlay is gone. I can see all my open windows, my mail client, web browser, terminals, everything, but the screen is still locked. If I type my password and hit ENTER, it unlocks and I can interact again, but this is where it gets really weird. All the windows have moved down a bit on the screen. For example, a terminal that was previously neatly positioned towards the bottom of the screen is now partially off the screen. So “something” crashed – whatever overlay the lock thingy put there is gone? And somehow this affected the position of all my application windows? What in the name of all that is good and holy is going on here?

Update 2020-12-21: I’ve opened boo#1180241 to track this.

Network Maintenance

To my intense amazement, it seems that NBN Co have finally done sufficient capacity expansion on our local fixed wireless tower to actually resolve the evening congestion issues we’ve been having for the past couple of years. Where previously we’d been getting 22-23Mbps during the day and more like 2-3Mbps (or worse) during the evenings, we’re now back to 22-23Mbps all the time, and the status lights on the NTD remain a pleasing green, rather than alternating between green and amber. This is how things were way back at the start, six years ago.

Continue reading

Herringback

It occurs to me that I never wrote up the end result of the support ticket I opened with iiNet after discovering significant evening packet loss on our fixed wireless NBN connection in August 2017.

The whole saga took about a month. I was asked to run a battery of tests (ping, traceroute, file download and speedtest, from a laptop plugged directly into the NTD) three times a day for three days, then send all the results in so that a fault could be lodged. I did this, but somehow there was a delay in the results being communicated, so that by the time someone actually looked at them, they were considered stale, and I had to run the whole set of tests all over again. It’s a good thing I work from home, because otherwise there’s no way it would be possible to spend half an hour three times a day running tests like this. Having finally demonstrated significant evening slowdowns, a fault was lodged, and eventually NBN Co admitted that there was congestion in the evenings.

Continue reading

Distributed Storage is Easier Now: Usability from Ceph Luminous to Nautilus

On January 21, 2019 I presented Distributed Storage is Easier Now: Usability from Ceph Luminous to Nautilus at the linux.conf.au 2019 Systems Administration Miniconf. Thanks to the incredible Next Day Video crew, the video was online the next day, and you can watch it here:

If you’d rather read than watch, the meat of the talk follows, but before we get to that I have two important announcements:

  1. Cephalocon 2019 is coming up on May 19-20, in Barcelona, Spain. The CFP is open until Friday February 1, so time is rapidly running out for submissions. Get onto it.
  2. If you’re able to make it to FOSDEM on February 2-3, there’s a whole Software Defined Storage Developer Room thing going on, with loads of excellent content including What’s new in Ceph Nautilus – project status update and preview of the coming release and Managing and Monitoring Ceph with the Ceph Manager Dashboard, which will cover rather more than I was able to here.

Continue reading

Hackweek0x10: Fun in the Sun

We recently had a 5.94KW solar PV system installed – twenty-two 270W panels (14 on the northish side of the house, 8 on the eastish side), with an ABB PVI-6000TL-OUTD inverter. Naturally I want to be able to monitor the system, but this model inverter doesn’t have an inbuilt web server (which, given the state of IoT devices, I’m actually kind of happy about); rather, it has an RS-485 serial interface. ABB sell addon data logger cards for several hundred dollars, but Rick from Affordable Solar Tasmania mentioned he had another client who was doing monitoring with a little Linux box and an RS-485 to USB adapter. As I had a Raspberry Pi 3 handy, I decided to do the same.

Continue reading